in ,

Trance duo Gaia tease new music

And we hope it’s an album!

Gaia, Armin van Buuren’s classic alias with Benno de Goeij, have teased the imminent release of new music on their Instagram page.

Over a week ago, Gaia began posting interesting facts on the various moons of Jupiter to further enhance their galactic-themed concept, ‘Moons Of Jupiter‘. The extraordinary theme first came to light during the announcement of their mind-blowing live performance at ADE last October, and they’ve continued with the same concept in recent posts, as a possible hint toward the name of an unreleased song or album title.

What’s more, they’ve posted a 48-second video clip as a hint to new music coming out very soon, featuring an atmospheric, melodic track that sounds out of this world!

The world of Trance was first introduced to the sounds of Gaia over 18 years ago. Together, their open minds and years of experience result in some of the most iconic Trance anthems, with highlights such as ‘Status Excessu D‘, ‘Tuvan‘, ‘J’ai Envie De Toi‘, ‘Empire Of Hearts‘ and ‘Inyathi‘.

They’ve kept Trance alive throughout the years and have delivered some of the most captivating performances at various music festivals across the globe including Ultra Music Festival, A State Of Trance, Electric Daisy Carnival and Dreamstate.

With Gaia, Armin van Buuren honours his love for Trance music: “I have more creative freedom in the sense that I want to go more underground, more into that Tech sound, rather than the Armin van Buuren sound which is obviously more uplifting and melodic. I can explore more of my darkside, if you will,” the legend told Trance Project during an interview on his visit to Australia in 2017.

Fans are, of course, hopeful the recent teasers lead to the announcement of Gaia’s much-anticipated album, but one thing’s for sure: Armin van Buuren and Benno de Goeij have crawled back into the harder, thicker skin of their Gaia guise, and we’re absolutely excited!

Check out their recent posts below:

View this post on Instagram

With a mean radius of 6.2 miles (10 kilometers), assuming an albedo of 0.04, Leda is the smallest moon in the Himalia group, a family of Jovian satellites which have similar orbits and appearance, and are therefore thought to have a common origin. Leda may be a chunk of an asteroid (a C- or D-class asteroid, judging by the fact that it reflects only about 4% of the light it receives), which was broken apart in a collision either before or after being captured by Jupiter’s gravity. In this scenario, the other pieces became the other moons in the Himalia group: Himalia (the largest), Lysithea and Elara. A fifth moon, called S/2000 J11, only about 2 km in radius, was considered a candidate for this group. However, it was lost before its orbit could be definitively determined. It may have crashed into Himalia, reuniting two pieces of the former asteroid, and perhaps creating a faint temporary ring of Jupiter near the orbit of Himalia. At a distance of about 6.9 million miles (11.2 million kilometers) from Jupiter, Leda takes nearly 241 Earth days to complete one orbit. #GAIA #MoonsOfJupiter

A post shared by GAIA (@gaia) on

View this post on Instagram

Himalia is the fifth largest moon orbiting Jupiter. With a mean radius of 85 km assuming an albedo of 0.04), it’s only about 5% the size of the fourth largest moon, Europa. But it’s by far the largest member of the Himalia group, a family of Jovian satellites which have similar orbits and appearance, and are therefore thought to have a common origin. Himalia may be the largest remaining chunk of an asteroid (a C- or D-class asteroid, judging by the fact that it reflects only about 4% of the light it receives), which had several pieces broken off in a collision either before or after being captured by Jupiter’s gravity. In this scenario, those pieces became the other moons in the Himalia group: Leda, Lysithea and Elara. A fifth moon, called S/2000 J11, only about 1.2 miles (2 kilometers) in radius, was considered a candidate for this group. However, it was lost before its orbit could be definitively determined. It may have crashed into Himalia, reuniting two pieces of the former asteroid, and perhaps creating a faint temporary ring of Jupiter near the orbit of Himalia. At a distance of about 7.1 million miles (11.5 million kilometers) from Jupiter, Himalia takes about 251 Earth days to complete one orbit. #GAIA #MoonsOfJupiter

A post shared by GAIA (@gaia) on

What do you think?

-1 points
Upvote Downvote

Written by Miguel Ramirez

My name is Miguel, and i'm a trance addict.

Elypsis shows the world just how entrancing his sound truly is with brand new remix

Listen to ilan Bluestone’s teaser of new kick-ass 138 BPM Trance anthem